Faculty

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Martha Oliver Withjack
Professor

Rutgers University
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Wright Geological Laboratory 243A
610 Taylor Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854-8066 U.S.A.

email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
tel: (732) 445-6974

Education

  • B.A., Rutgers University 
  • M.A., Ph. D., Brown University

Courses

  • Undergraduate: Field Geology,Structural Geology,Tectonics and Regional Structural Geology
  • Graduate: Advanced Tectonics; Acquisition, Processing & Interpretation of Seismic Reflection Data; Modeling in Structural Geology: Geometric, Experimental & Numerical

Research Interests

  • Extensional tectonics; rift-basin and passive-margin development; experimental modeling of geologic structures; seismic interpretation; petroleum geology

Publications

  • Schlische, R.W., Withjack, M.O., and Olsen, P.E., 2002, Relative timing of CAMP, rifting, continental breakup, and inversion: tectonic significance, in Hames, W.E., McHone, G.C., Renne, P.R., and Ruppel, C.R., eds., The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province: Insights from Fragments of Pangea: American Geophysical Union Monograph 136, p. 33-59. >>PDF File
  • Schlische, R.W., Withjack, M.O., and Eisenstadt, G., 2002, An experimental study of the secondary deformation produced by oblique-slip normal faulting: AAPG Bulletin, v. 86, p. 885-906.  >>PDF file
  • Ackermann, R.V., Schlische, R.W., and Withjack, M.O., 2001, The geometric and statistical evolution of normal fault systems: an experimental study of the effects of mechanical layer thickness on scaling laws: Journal of Structural Geology, v. 23, p. 1803-1819. >>PDF file
  • Clifton, A.E., Schlische, R.W., Withjack, M.O., and Ackermann, R.V., 2000, Influence of rift obliquity on fault-population systematics: results of clay modeling experiments: Journal of Structural Geology, v. 22, p. 1491-1509. >>PDF file
  • Withjack, M. O., and Callaway, J. S., 2000, Active normal faulting beneath a salt layer -- an experimental study of deformation in the cover sequence:  AAPG Bulletin, v. 84, p. 627-651. >>PDF file
  • Clifton, A.E., Schlische, R.W., Withjack, M.O., and Ackermann, R.V., 2000, Influence of rift obliquity on fault-population systematics: results of clay modeling experiments: Journal of Structural Geology, v. 22, p. 1491-1509. >>PDF file
  • Withjack, M.O., Schlische, R.W., and Olsen, P.E., 1998, Diachronous rifting, drifting, and inversion on the passive margin of central eastern North America: An analog for other passive margins: AAPG Bulletin, v. 82, p. 817-835. >>PDF File
  • Withjack, M. O., Olsen, P. E., and Schlische, R. W., 1995, Tectonic evolution of the Fundy basin, Canada: Evidence of extension and shortening during passive-margin development: Tectonics, v. 14, p. 390-405.
  • Withjack, M., Islam, Q., and LaPointe, P., 1995, Normal faults and their hanging-wall deformation--an experimental study:  AAPG Bulletin, v. 79, p. 1-18. >>PDF file
  • Eisenstadt, G., and Withjack, M., 1995, Estimating inversion--results from clay-model studies:  in Basin Inversion, Geological Society of London, Special Publication 88, p. 119-136.
  • Withjack, M., and Islam, Q., 1993, Origin of rollover--a discussion:  AAPG Bulletin, v. 77, p. 657-658.
  • Withjack, M., and Peterson, E., 1993, Prediction of normal-fault geometries--a sensitivity analysis:  AAPG Bulletin, v. 77, p. 1860-1873. >>PDF file
  • Withjack, M., Olson, J., and Peterson, E., 1990, Experimental models of extensional forced folds:  AAPG Bulletin, v. 74, p. 1038-1054.

Extensional Tectonics Working Group at Rutgers

Structural Geology and Tectonics at Rutgers (PDF file; 816 KB)

Juliane

Juliane Gross
Associate Professor

Rutgers University
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Wright Geological Laboratory 345
610 Taylor Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854-8066 U.S.A.

email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
tel: (732) 445-3619

Education

  • PhD, Ruhr-University of Bochum, Germany

Courses

  • Undergraduate: Planet Mars
  • Graduate: Seminar "Planetary Sciences"

Research Interests

My research focuses on investigating the formation and evolution of differentiated planetary bodies, such as Moon, Mars, and Earth.
I study in detail the mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry of planetary samples by using field techniques for terrestrial analogues and micro-analytical techniques.  Such techniques include ElectronProbeMicroAnalyzer (EPMA), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and optical microscopy.
I combine these techniques with experimental techniques, such as 1 atm gas-mixing furnaces, hydrothermal diamond anvil cells, and Laser Irradiation Space Weathering experiments in order to learn about crustal and mantle evolution of the parental planetary bodies.

I am specifically interested in:
I) rock types poorly/not represented by returned samples and their formation histories especially on the Moon,
II) the chemical and physical conditions and evolutionary history of parental melt on planetary bodies, especially Mars,
III) the volatile constituents of planetary interiors,
IV) the use of planetary materials as ground truth for remote sensing,
V) the effect of micrometeorite bombardment and impact gardening on airless planetary surfaces,
and  VI) terrestrial analogues to planetary environments.

Publications

See my CV

Jill A. VanTongeren
Assistant Professor

Rutgers University
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Wright Geological Laboratory 343
610 Taylor Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854-8066 U.S.A.

email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
tel: (732) 445-5363

Education

  • B.S., University of Michigan
  • M.A.,PhD Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Courses

  • Undergraduate:
  • Graduate:

Research Interests

  • Geochemical and Thermal Evolution of Large Magma Chambers: My research on the evolution of large magma chambers has focused primarily on the Upper Zone of the Bushveld Complex of South Africa.  The Bushveld Complex is the world’s largest layered mafic intrusion and is one of the world’s largest sources of precious metals.  The Upper Zone is thought to represent the final pulse of magma into the Bushveld, and is ideal for investigating the effects of heat loss and extreme differentiation of large magma bodies
  • Processes in the Lower Oceanic Crust: My research on the oceanic crust focuses primarily on the thermal evolution and cooling rates in the lower oceanic crust at spreading ridges. Specifically, I am interested in quantifying the variation in cooling rates with depth in lower crustal gabbros in the Oman ophiolite. This work is important for understanding the role of hydrothermal convection throughout the lower crust as well as mechanisms of lower crustal accretion at ridges.
  • Early Earth Tectonics: The construction of oceanic crust in the modern day can inform our understanding of how the crust might have formed in the Archean, when mantle potential temperatures were hotter, magma compositions were more magnesian, and oceanic crust was much thicker.  My work is focused on how changing magma composition influences the phase equilibria present within the crust.  The results have implications for the density of the Archean crust, the onset of plate tectonics, and possibly the creation of the ‘building blocks’ of continental crust.

Publications


sherrell

Robert Sherrell
Associate Professor

Rutgers University
Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences
610 Taylor Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854-8066 U.S.A.

email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
tel: (732) 932-6555

Education

  • B.A., Oberlin College
  • Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Courses

  • Undergraduate: Environmental Geochemistry

Research Interests

  • Geochemistry of marine and fresh waters; paleochemical records in ice cores
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